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Lisle Speech Language Pathologists

April 2015

National Autism Awareness Month

In order to highlight the growing need for concern and awareness about autism, the Autism Society has been celebrating National Autism Awareness Month since the 1970s. The United States recognizes April as a special opportunity to educate the public about autism and issues within the autism community.

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. Autism is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum disorder” that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. There is no known single cause of autism, but increased awareness and funding can help families today. Some of the behaviors associated with autism include delayed learning of language; difficulty making eye contact or holding a conversation; difficulty with executive functioning, which relates to reasoning and planning; narrow, intense interests; poor motor skills’ and sensory sensitivities. Again, a person on the spectrum might follow many of these behaviors or just a few, or many others besides. The diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder is applied based on analysis of all behaviors and their severity. 

Know the signs: Early identification can change lives

Autism is treatable. Children do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes. 

Here are some signs to look for in the children in your life:

·         Lack of or delay in spoken language

·         Repetitive use of language and/or motor mannerisms (e.g., hand-flapping, twirling objects)

·         Little or no eye contact

·         Lack of interest in peer relationships

·         Lack of spontaneous or make-believe play

·         Persistent fixation on parts of objects

 

Arbor Day (April 24th 2015)

On Arbor Day, people are encouraged to care for their natural environment. It's a time for people to get their hands in the dirt and plant and/or care for trees, bushes and plants. Events include: communal tree planting, exhibitions, fairs, music performances and open days in garden centers. Arbor Day awards are also presented in communities, schools, and organizations throughout the United States.

History of Arbor Day

In 1854 J Sterling Morton moved from Detroit to the area that is now Nebraska. He and other pioneers noticed a lack of trees, which were needed to act as windbreaks to stabilize the soil and to give shade from the sun. Morton planted many trees around his own home and encouraged others to do the same.

On January 4, 1872, he proposed a holiday to plant trees on April 10 that year. This was known as "Arbor Day" and prizes were awarded to the counties and individuals who planted the most trees on the day. About one million trees were planted in Nebraska on the first Arbor Day. In 1885, Arbor Day became a legal holiday and was moved to April 22, which was Morton's birthday. In 1989 the official state holiday was moved to the last Friday in April. All states in the US now have an official Arbor Day, usually at a time of year that is has the best weather conditions for planting trees.

Earth Day (April 22nd)

Each year, Earth Day -- April 22 -- marks the anniversary of what many consider the birth of the modern environmental movement in 1970.

The height of hippie and flower-child culture in the United States, 1970 brought the death of Jimi Hendrix, the last Beatles album, and Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water”. Protest was the order of the day, but saving the planet was not the cause. War raged in Vietnam, and students nationwide increasingly opposed it.

At the time, Americans were slurping leaded gas through massive V8 sedans. Industry belched out smoke and sludge with little fear of legal consequences or bad press. Air pollution was commonly accepted as the smell of prosperity. “Environment” was a word that appeared more often in spelling bees than on the evening news.  Although mainstream America remained oblivious to environmental concerns, the stage had been set for change by the publication of Rachel Carson's New York Times bestseller Silent Spring in 1962.  The book represented a watershed moment for the modern environmental movement, selling more than 500,000 copies in 24 countries and, up until that moment, more than any other person, Ms. Carson raised public awareness and concern for living organisms, the environment and public health.

Earth Day 1970 capitalized on the emerging consciousness, channeling the energy of the anti-war protest movement and putting environmental concerns front and center.

 

Dinner Talk Ideas (Questions to ask your student)

When doing “Dinner Talks” remind your child/ren to use their strategies in order to speak with correct pronunciation, be fluent, and to speak in grammatically correct sentences. Please correct your child’s errors when they are heard. Thank you for your continued support of your child’s speech and language program.

How do you currently help the environment?

What else can you do to help the environment?

What do people with Autism struggle with?

Do you know anyone with Autism?

 

5 minutes of daily practice is needed to help with the carryover process.

 

March 2015

Woman’s History Month

Take the time to learn about women who have made a difference in our country. There are many woman leaders who have helped change how woman are treated.

Dates in March to think about

March 2nd Dr. Suess Day

Everyone should pick up a book and read. Hopefully you will choose one of your favorite Dr. Suess books from when you were younger. Talk about your favorite Dr. Suess book. What do most of his books have in common.

March 17th St. Patrick’s Day

Share about the many traditions that come from this day. Talk about the items you see on this day. Will you attend any parades? Do you like eating Corned beef and cabbage?

March 21st Down Syndrome Day

What is Down syndrome?

Down syndrome is a genetic condition that causes delays in physical and intellectual development resulting from the presence of an extra chromosome – individuals with Down syndrome have 47 instead of the usual 46.

The presence of the additional genetic material alters development and causes characteristics that are associated with Down syndrome – including low muscle tone, small stature, an upward slant to the eyes and a single deep crease across the center of the palm.

How common is Down syndrome?

Down syndrome occurs in approximately one in every 691 live births, making it the most frequently occurring chromosomal disorder. There are about 400,000 Americans diagnosed with Down syndrome and approximately 6,000 babies are born with Down syndrome each year in the United States.

Dinner Talk Ideas (Questions to ask your student)

When doing “Dinner Talks” remind your child/ren to use their strategies in order to speak with correct pronunciation, be fluent, and to speak in grammatically correct sentences. Please correct your child’s errors when they are heard. Thank you for your continued support of your child’s speech and language program.

Choose one of the topics above and discuss them.

 

5 minutes of daily practice is needed to help with the carryover process.

 

At Home Games to Practice Speech and Language

Go Fish: you can use a regular deck of cards to review numbers, or you could use other decks of cards (can be found at Wal-Mart, Kmart, etc) that contain pictures of animals, opposites, shapes, colors, etc.  There are many areas to target while playing Go Fish.  Here are just a few examples

Practice Formulating Questions:  The game gives children an opportunity to practice formulating the question “Do you have a ….” multiple times during the game.   .

Vocabulary Development: It may be easier to use a deck of cards that have pictures on them (Again, found at most stores) rather than a regular deck.  Additionally, it may be easier to print, cut, and paste pictures onto 3x5’’ index cards to make your own game!

Articulation Practice: Again, it may be easier to print, cut, and paste your child’s speech sounds on index cards; however, you could also use a regular deck of cards and play a regular game.  If you notice a speech sound error, correct and have them repeat your model.

Description/definition Practice: Have your child describe the picture they want from you, e.g. Do you have an animal with feathers that flies and lays eggs?

Memory Game: If you have a memory game, it would be a great chance to strengthen memory skills, same/different concepts, and of course, speech sounds. 

Picture Walk with Books: Looking through a variety of picture books with your child will encourage reading, as well as targeting language and speech sounds.  Have your child describe the pictures they see in a book (using their “good speech sounds,” of course).

Mrs. Lauten’s Speech and Language Website: Please refer to my website for any additional information regarding speech and language development and activities.

http://www.lisle202.org/vnews/display.v/SEC/Schiesher%7CSpeech%20and%20Language

Additional Online Games: There are many websites out there to help parents work with their children at home with their speech and language.  Here are just a few:  

http://www.speech-language-development.com

http://www.quia.com/pages/havemorefun.html

 

Speech Language Pathologists in Lisle Community Unit School District 202

Theresa Lauten M.S.Ed., M.A., CCC-SLP
Licensed Speech Language Pathologist

Services Schiesher Elementary Grades Kindergarten & 3-5
630-493-8175
tlauten@lisle202.org

Referral Form: Theresa Lauten

Mary Bumpus M.A. CCC-SLP
Services Lisle Junior High School, Lisle Senior High & 5th Grade
(she is a part-time Speech Language Pathologist 
for Lisle School District)
630-493-8289

mbumpus@lisle202.org

Referral Form: Mary Bumpus

Our mission

To provide quality speech-language services to children with communication disorders and give support to their families.

Click here for articulation milestones

State Foundations

ISHA (Illinois Speech-Language and Hearing Association)   www.ishail.org

ASHA (American Speech, Language and Hearing Association)
www.asha.org
SFA (Stuttering Foundation of America)
www.stuttersfa.org
Illinois State Learning Standards
www.isbe.state.il.us/ils/Default.htm

 

Click on the links below to find out more about each topic:

Apraxia Articulation
Autism Craniofacial
Hearing Home Activities
Language Nonverbal
Phonology Pragmatics
Stuttering Swallowing
Voice Word Finding

Created by Theresa Lauten M.S.Ed., M.A., CCC-SLP 
                Licensed Speech Language Pathologist

 

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Schiesher Elementary 5205 Kingston Ave. Lisle, IL  60532
Phone: 630-493-8100

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